Did you know or even want to?

G’day all,

Often when a friend seemingly disappears off the net with no explanation or forewarning, I find myself checking their page every now and again, being a well known sticky-beak I eventually become besieged by doubt and/or concern as time passes, are they ill, do they have writers block or maybe they have lost interest? Seldom does it enter my befuddled brain that anyone of you may have a life in the real world that takes precedents every now and again.

So with that thought in mind, seeing I myself dropped off the web without a by-your-leave for a month or so, to return to the bush to have a holiday with my elderly Aunt, albeit nursing an egotistical hope that someone out there may have noticed my absence,and understand why I have not replied to messages etc (no internet in the bush) I have decided to open a Did you know or even want to page.

In the past I have only posted, literary content, this being somewhat because I am still very much a newbie on W/P and still trying to work out all the technical ins-and-outs, much to my distress at times, anyway, I have decided to take the bull by the horns and use this page as more a personal section, that may or may-not have anything to do with the serious side of writing Per se.

This is not to say I will be undulating you with enthralling titbits about when our dog does something cute, or our chooks lay a double yoker, no, but to jot different thoughts that I feel the urge to note down,
such as today being a special day here in Aus, and as every True Blue out there, I just want to say to those that fought and died, so we could live in freedom, peace and harmony

Thank you

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning.
We will remember them.
Lest We Forget.

Anzac Day – 25 April – is one of Australia’s most important national occasions. It marks the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and New Zealand forces during the First World War. The Australian and New Zealand (ANZAC) forces landed on Gallipoli on 25 April 1915, meeting fierce resistance from the Ottoman Turkish defenders.

What had been planned as a bold stroke to knock Turkey out of the war quickly became a stalemate, and the campaign dragged on for eight months. At the end of 1915, the allied forces were evacuated from the peninsula, with both sides having suffered heavy casualties and endured great hardships.
More than 8,000 Australian soldiers had been killed. The Gallipoli campaign had a profound impact on Australians at home, and 25 April soon became the day on which Australians remembered the sacrifice of those who died in the war.

Although the Gallipoli campaign failed in its military objectives, the Australian and New Zealand actions during the campaign left us all a powerful legacy. The creation of what became known as the “Anzac legend” became an important part of the identity of both nations, shaping the way we view both our past and our future.
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